Csx ocs train

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Conrail’s Crown Jewel:
The Conrail Office Car Special

Why write about the Conrail Office Car Special?

I suppose you could ask the same question about any railroad topic, but the Conrail OCS train has captured my interest for many years. The Conrail business train was the railroad’s best foot forward and represented their commitment to the customer, employees, shareholders, and to the railroad itself. It also offered an opportunity for management to talk with employees at terminals and customers at industries.

The cars and locomotives that are discussed and pictured on this page are no longer Conrail’s. There are no more gold logos. So, in an attempt to preserve their history, offer an inside view of their interiors, highlight the employees who were dedicated to their maintenance and operation, and to preserve the stories of those who rode the train, this website has been created.

It goes without saying that it takes time to gather, interview, research, and collect the materials to write this site. I kindly ask that you respect the work by not copying, reposting, printing, or publishing the collection. Instead, link back to this page. All of the material here is ©Wes Reminder and each contributor.

The porter box in Conrail 5 (formerly Conrail 100 “Boston”) tells the crew what area of the car assistance is needed. Each room has a doorbell-like button that when pushed turns the arrow to the upward position. The cord on the right resets the arro…

What is the Conrail OCS train?

At the Conrail Juniata Shops, hidden inside Miscellaneous Shop 2, was the Conrail exclusive business train equipment. The Conrail OCS (or Conrail office car special) was Conrail’s inspection, marketing, and educational tool used to promote the railroad’s various initiatives. Since the downfall of Conrail as a class one railroad in 1999, the term OCS has carried over to other railroads and can often be heard in reference to Norfolk Southern and CSX business trains. Interestingly enough, the term has no real meaning to those railroads and is used generically to describe those trains. Conrail office car specials are also referred to as Conrail inspection trains, Conrail business trains, Conrail presidential trains, Conrail executive trains, Conrail OLS trains, and on and on. They all basically mean the same thing: the Conrail OCS train.

The term OCS was used by Conrail dispatchers to designate a movement of their office car special, much like they did with their freight trains. For example, train “ENBU” was a designation for a general freight train where “EN” stands for Enola and “BU” stands for Buffalo. The OCS train didn’t run on a regular schedule and was used as needed, much like other special trains on the Conrail system. A good example of another unscheduled train would be their ballast trains; those trains carried the symbol “BAL”.

In the 1990s Conrail was made up of 6 divisions (5 after the consolidation of the Harrisburg Division), and Conrail office car trains were symbolled in the following ways:

OCS-101 = 1 for Philadelphia Division
OCS-201 = 2 for Harrisburg Division
OCS-301 = 3 for Albany Division
OCS-401 = 4 for Pittsburgh Division
OCS-501 = 5 for Dearborn Division
OCS-601 = 6 for Indianapolis Division

Conrail’s track geometry equipment, which was often mistaken for the OCS, had its very own train designation: TES. That equipment was not technically part of the office car specials and was used by the mechanical department for research, track survey, and improvement purposes. There are noted occasions where some of the TES equipment joined the OCS, probably to show off their capability, but this was outside of the norm. TES equipment had silver roofs; whereas, the office cars were green top to bottom. The geometry equipment was all business and no pleasure. Don’t believe me? Check out this great blog post from Don Oltmann on the dynamometer car, Conrail 20.

What is the Conrail OCS train?

At the Conrail Juniata Shops, hidden inside Miscellaneous Shop 2, was the Conrail exclusive business train equipment. The Conrail OCS (or Conrail office car special) was Conrail’s inspection, marketing, and educational tool used to promote the railroad’s various initiatives. Since the downfall of Conrail as a class one railroad in 1999, the term OCS has carried over to other railroads and can often be heard in reference to Norfolk Southern and CSX business trains. Interestingly enough, the term has no real meaning to those railroads and is used generically to describe those trains. Conrail office car specials are also referred to as Conrail inspection trains, Conrail business trains, Conrail presidential trains, Conrail executive trains, Conrail OLS trains, and on and on. They all basically mean the same thing: the Conrail OCS train.

The term OCS was used by Conrail dispatchers to designate a movement of their office car special, much like they did with their freight trains. For example, train “ENBU” was a designation for a general freight train where “EN” stands for Enola and “BU” stands for Buffalo. The OCS train didn’t run on a regular schedule and was used as needed, much like other special trains on the Conrail system. A good example of another unscheduled train would be their ballast trains; those trains carried the symbol “BAL”.

In the 1990s Conrail was made up of 6 divisions (5 after the consolidation of the Harrisburg Division), and Conrail office car trains were symbolled in the following ways:

OCS-101 = 1 for Philadelphia Division
OCS-201 = 2 for Harrisburg Division
OCS-301 = 3 for Albany Division
OCS-401 = 4 for Pittsburgh Division
OCS-501 = 5 for Dearborn Division
OCS-601 = 6 for Indianapolis Division

Conrail’s track geometry equipment, which was often mistaken for the OCS, had its very own train designation: TES. That equipment was not technically part of the office car specials and was used by the mechanical department for research, track survey, and improvement purposes. There are noted occasions where some of the TES equipment joined the OCS, probably to show off their capability, but this was outside of the norm. TES equipment had silver roofs; whereas, the office cars were green top to bottom. The geometry equipment was all business and no pleasure. Don’t believe me? Check out this great blog post from Don Oltmann on the dynamometer car, Conrail 20.

Riding the Conrail OCS train according to Steve Timko

Fortunately, there are some great videos of train rides on the OCS train. Surely, one of the most popular is from YouTube user fmnut and is titled “Conrail OCS On Board” and if you have any interest in the train, it is worth watching. But a good story from someone who has ridden the train is always an interesting read.

Steve Timko rode the CR OCS train over thousands of miles of the Conrail system. In fact, when Steve was the Manager of Operations Planning from 1996-1999 in Pittsburgh, he was in charge of putting together the booklets that were distributed to invited attendees. Steve laid out the booklets and had the clerical forces prepare them and send them to the printer. I’m fortunate to have some of those very booklets and they are really well done.

Steve recounts a trip he made in 1992 when he was the Trainmaster in Youngstown, Ohio. “Sharon Steel, one of our customers in Sharon, Pennsylvania had just come out of bankruptcy. I had car 10 (former Queen Elizabeth of NYC fame) and car 4 in for a reception. We served lunch for the VIPs in car 10 and the porters rode in car 4 from Altoona to Sharon and return”. Steve speaks highly of the Conrail Executive Chef, Michael Kennedy, saying “he could NOT be outdone”.

On another trip in 1992, Steve remembers an incident where two office cars were added to the rear of TV-3. It turns out that the train needed a helper to get over the mountain. Nothing out of the ordinary, except it broke all of the dishes.

Did the OCS train ever speed? Well, as a matter of fact it did. “The former Southern Region and the Central Region were combined at some time. The General Manager was in Pittsburgh and was over everything west of Harrisburg to Ft. Wayne, and south of the former NYC along the lake. One morning I was asked to ride the OCS from Conway to Harrisburg in place of the General Manager. The GM was on the train from Indianapolis to Pittsburgh. He was getting off and I was to take over--it was a deadhead move.  Since the crews changed at Conway, I got on there.  As I went back in the Theatre Car I see the General Manager and he is quite unhappy. I said ‘good morning, how's it going?’  He replied, ‘I'll tell you how its going Steve. Did you ever hear the trucks of a car creak as they went around a curve too fast? Well, imagine the sound of the wheels thrown up against the outer rail of the curve and the trucks of the car screaming, figuring that the trucks were going to fly apart at any second.’ The Division Road Foreman was running the engine. No one realized that they were upon the 45 MPH speed restriction at MP 72 just west of Salem, OH. They hit the 45 MPH curve at 73 MPH, ran down into Salem at that speed (normally 60, dropping to 50) and were actually across road crossings at Allen Road, Pershing Street, Wilson Avenue, New Garden Road, Mill Street, and Ellsworth Avenue BEFORE the crossing signals were activated!” So needless to say, those E8As got the train moving!

In 1996 after Steve became the Managers of Operations Planning in Pittsburgh, he hosted the Youngstown section of a safety trip. Ron Conway, Senior of VP of Operations and Gary Spiegel, Vice President of Transportation, were both in attendance as the train came into Conway from Philadelphia. Part of the train was left in Conway for a Safety Recognition event, while Steve took the Youngstown section of the train with bedroom car 8, heavyweight observation car 1, and the theater car 9 to Youngstown and Lordstown. The train stayed overnight, leaving in the morning for Ashtabula for lunch, before heading back to Conway to join the rest of the equipment. Steve has fond memories of the CR OCS train recalling “good food, good friends and good booze”.

He goes on to describe the meals on the Conrail Office Car Special as elegant. “Senior operating officers on the train would decide what breakfast was going to be, typically either French toast or pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, ham, sausage, fresh fruit, juice, and coffee. Lunch was normally cold cut sandwiches … also had fresh salads with chicken or fish over greens. Normally no soup. Dinners were steaks, salmon, roasted turkey, or whatever the chef prepared as asked for by the person in charge. I rode an Engineering Department trip once from Alliance to Crestline and we had crab legs and roast beef when we parked at Crestline for the night. Alcoholic beverages were available moderately after the train was parked for the night —NOT WHILE TRAVELING, except an occasional glass of wine with dinner if still on the move. Coffee, juice, and soft drinks were available 24/7.”

“Mike Kennedy was the Chief Chef for Conrail. He handled most of the cooking, with one of the waiters assisting with prep work. Of course, if two trains were running at the same time, Mike would man the big train and another waiter/cook would work the smaller train, normally cooking in Car 10 or one of the business cars. The porters and chef came from the Philadelphia-Reading area and were “retired” Pullman Porters or Penn Central chauffeurs.”

How were Conrail OCS trains operated?

Mr. Fox was the Manager of Special Equipment from 1983 until 1990 and his duties on Conrail included the oversight of the business cars, which meant he rode almost all Conrail OCS trips during that time. He oversaw the building, designing, and maintenance of the business cars during a time when the Conrail office car fleet was undergoing its largest expansion. He oversaw some of the following significant events in the OCS history:

  • Acquisition and building of Conrail 9, the theater car.

  • Acquisition of three Southern Railway coaches, converting one of them to Conrail 8 bedroom car.

  • The switch from steam heat to 480 volts so the business cars would be compatible with Amtrak.

  • The acquisition of Conrail 100 (later Conrail 5) for Richard Sanborn and travelled with his body in the car to Boston after his untimely death.

  • Worked with Stanley Crane to change the Conrail blue paint scheme to Conrail green. During a conversation with him, he confirmed that the office car fleet was painted green from the top of the roof all the way down to the rails. The gold Conrail logos used were manufactured for Conrail and simply rolled out and stuck to the side of the equipment (they were not hand cut or handmade).

  • Conrail 10 truck change out from three axles to two axles (and testing the car on the Northeast Corridor over 120 mph).

  • Travelled with the office cars off of the Conrail system, including over the Rocky Mountains.

After 1990, Mr. Fox was replaced by Carl Kennedy when he went on to work at the Conway Diesel Terminal, leading it to its safest and most successful years. The business car fleet was then handled by two gentlemen: Jim Smith, Operations and Carl Kennedy, Mechanical. Jim oversaw the cooks and food, and Carl (whose title was General Foreman, Altoona Passenger Operations) was in charge of the mechanical aspect of the train. Carl replaced Mr. Fox in 1990 and like Mr. Fox, rode most OCS trips and also preferred to stay in the lower master bedroom of the Conrail full length dome car, 55.

Sleeping arrangements on the Conrail office cars were hard to come by. Conrail 1 was assigned to Ron Conway and Gary Spiegel. Conrail 11 was used by the cooks and porters. Conrail 4 had two bedrooms, Conrail 3 and Conrail 5 had three bedrooms, and Conrail 8 had 8 bedrooms. Steve mentioned that Conrail had been considering purchasing two more Pullman cars in 1997, but “along came the takeover and we opted to spend the money elsewhere.”

The food for the Conrail Office Car Specials came from a private club in Philadelphia and was first class. The food was taken to the train in the Altoona Misc Shop in coolers by a van with the porters and chefs. This same process happened when the train was kept in Reading. Conrail’s headquarters was in Philadelphia and the train often originated at Amtrak’s 30th Street Station. If that were the case, the Conrail OCS equipment would deadhead (be taken empty) to Philadelphia with just Carl on board. Jim Smith, the cooks, and porters would load up the train at 30th street.

As part of their education initiatives, Conrail often ran Operation Lifesaver trips. Those trips could have as many as 250 people onboard. If they needed more seating space, Conrail would add a business car or two. A typical Conrail OLS train trip would consist of the following pieces of equipment:

Conrail 4020 E8A and Conrail 4021 E8A

Conrail Observation 10 (platform to head end)

Conrail Bedroom Car 8 or Conrail Crew Sleeper 11

Conrail Coach 27

Conrail Full Length Dome 55

Conrail Conference Car 12 (for serving food)

Conrail Theater Car 9

In contrast, Conrail Inspection trips would have a slightly different consist including the heavyweight Pullman observation cars:

Conrail 4020 E8A and Conrail 4021 E8A (sometimes even Conrail 4022 E8A)

Conrail Observation 3

Conrail Observation 4

Conrail Observation 5

Conrail Observation 1

Conrail Bedroom Car 8

Conrail Crew Sleeper 11

Conrail 55

Conrail Coach 27 (for crew and visitors to sit)

Conrail Conference Car 12 (for serving food)

Conrail Theater Car 9 (for track inspection)

If you were a Conrail employee and were invited to ride the Conrail office car special, you would often receive a letter, boarding pass, name tag, trip booklets, collectibles, and other Conrail related items. Some examples of these items are displayed below, including a Conrail HQ Two Commerce Square magnet and sleeping car arrangement assignments for Conrail 8, the executive sleeper. You can imagine the work that went into each trip.

Conrail OCS Train Invitation
Conrail OCS Trip Itinerary
Conrail OCS Train Route Map
Conrail OCS Train Boarding Pass
Conrail OCS Sleeper 8 Assignments
Conrail HQ Magnet Conrail OCS Train

Conrail OCS train equipment

The Conrail OCS equipment and its history is well documented. My Conrail Blog outlines its history (including its disposition), diagrams, and photos in detail (as well as some of my HO modelling attempts). At some point all of the cars will be added. You don’t have to look too far for this information as Conrail documents like Trip Booklets, Official Equipment Diagrams, Press Releases, and employee magazines contain a wealth of information, some of which will be made available on this site.

The Conrail business train roster changed throughout the years, but as a quick reference here is listing of the final business train roster. I love the date ranges of the heavyweight cars. Conrail 5 is still used on Norfolk Southern, check out that build date…1911! Remember for more details, visit my Conrail Blog.

Conrail 1 - Office Car - HW - Built 1920

Conrail 3 - Office Car - HW - Built 1928

Conrail 4 - Office Car - HW - Built 1927

Conrail 5 - Office Car - HW - Built 1911

Conrail 8 - Bedroom Car - HW - Built 1917

Conrail 9 - Theater Car - LW - Built 1954

Conrail 10 - Office / Parlor / Inspection Car - HW - Built 1925

Conrail 11 - Staff Sleeper - LW - Built 1954

Conrail 12 - Conference Car - LW - Built 1952

Conrail 19 - Research Test Car - HW - Built 1930 (Included in this list as it was formerly Conrail 2)

Conrail 27 - Coach - LW - Built 1947

Conrail 55 - Full Length Dome Car - LW - Built 1954

Conrail 4020 - EMD E8A - Built 1951

Conrail 4021 - EMD E8A - Built 1952

Conrail 4022 - EMD E8A - Built 1951

Do you have something to share about the Conrail Office Car Special?

If you have first hand stories, photos, paperwork, or memorabilia about the Conrail OCS, please feel free to contact me. I’m always on the hunt for new content. If you have slides or paperwork and would like them scanned, sent back, and provided to you as hi-res images, I can help with that for no charge.

Article ©Wes Reminder 2020. May be used in part or whole without permission.
Images ©Wes Reminder, Chip Syme and may not used on the web, print, or any other use without permission.
Conrail logo and Conrail materials are ©Consolidate Rail Corporation.

A special thanks to Chip Syme for providing some of the excellent Conrail OCS photos featured in this article and throughout the site.
A special thanks to Steve Timko, author of over 100 railroad books, for sharing his experiences and knowledge of the train.
A special thanks to Mr. Fox for his stories about his career and time spent as Conrail’s Manager of Special Equipment.

Sours: https://www.the-boring-the-adoring.com/conrail-office-car-special

Eastern Railroad Discussion > CSX OCS Schedule


Date: 05/12/01 04:32
CSX OCS Schedule
Author: k8dti

CSX will be operating a series of Office Car Specials through the region this week. Below is a schedule.

Consist From Headend:

CSXT - 9992 and 9993 Locomotives - Back to Back
CSXT - 363 Kentucky - Generator end forward
CSXT - 8 Mississippi - No particular direction
CSXT - 307 Washington - Platform end forward
CSXT - 308 Florida - Platform end rear
*CSXT - 350 Illinois - Vestibule end forward (switch into train consist at Cincinnati, OH)
CSXT - 10 New York - Platform end rear
CSXT - 12 Michigan - Vestibule end rear
CSXT - 9 Massachusetts - Observation end rear

DP=Depart AR=Arrival BY=BY

Special Train P966-12

Saturday - May 12th
DP - Jacksonville 1700
BY - Waycross 1830
AR - Fitzgerald 2030 change crew
DP - Fitzgerald 2040
BY - Manchester 2210
AR - Atlanta 0230 change crew
DP - Atlanta 0240

Sunday - May 13th
AR - Etowah 0740 change crew
DP - Etowah 0750
AR - Corbin 1405 change crew
DP - Corbin 1415
AR - Cincinnati - Queensgate Yard 2015 change crew, fuel locomotives (841 miles), pick up CSXT 350 / Illinois
DP - Cincinnati - Queensgate Yard 2145

Monday - May 14th
AR - Columbus - Intermodel Facility 0245 water coaches

Special Train P967-15 - Day One

Tuesday - May 15th
DP - Columbus - Intermodel Facility 0800
AR - Marysville - Maple St. crossing 0900 board passengers
DP - Marysville 0905
AR - Kenton - Yard Office 0945 board passengers
DP - Kenton 0950
AR - Findlay - Between 1st and Hancock St. 1030 board passengers
DP - Findlay 1035
AR - Bowling Green - Poe Road 1115 board passengers
DP - Bowling Green 1120
AR - Walbridge 1200 run wye
DP - Walbridge 1230
AR - Bowling Green - Poe Road 1300 detrain passengers
DP - Bowling Green 1305
AR - Findlay - Between 1st and Hancock St. 1345 detrain passengers
DP - Findlay 1350
AR - Kenton - Yard Office 1430 detrain passengers
DP - Kenton 1435
AR - Marysville - Maple St. crossing 1515 detrain passengers
DP - Marysville 1520
AR - Columbus - Intermodel Facility 1600 detrain passengers
DP - Columbus 1645
AR - Willard - Myrtle Ave. crossing 1945 layover, Water Coaches

Special Train P978-17 - Day Two
Thursday - May 17th
DP - Willard - Myrtle Ave. crossing 0800
AR - Tiffin - Monroe St. crossing 0845 load passengers
DP - Tiffin 0850
AR - Fostoria - Amtrak Station 0915 load passengers
DP - Fostoria 0920
AR - N Baltimore - S Main St. crossing 0950 load passengers
DP - N Baltimore 0955
AR - Deshler - Old Depot Main St. 1020 load passengers
DP - Deshler 1025
AR - Holgate - Railway Ave. crossing 1050 load passengers
DP - Holgate 1055
AR - Defiance - Depot Clinton St. 1115 load passengers
DP - Defiance 1120
AR - Garrett - Randolph St. 1200 run around wye
DP - Garrett 1300
AR - Defiance - Depot Clinton St. 1350 detrain passengers
DP - Defiance 1355
AR - Holgate - Railway Ave. crossing 1410 detrain passengers
DP - Holgate 1415
AR - Deshler - Old Depot Main St. 1430 detrain passengers
DP - Deshler 1435
AR - N Baltimore - Main St. crossing 1450 detrain passengers
DP - N Baltimore 1455
AR - Fostoria - Amtrak Station 1520 detrain passengers
DP - Fostoria 1525
AR - Tiffin - Monroe St. crossing 1540 detrain passengers
DP - Tiffin 1545
AR - Willard - Myrtle Ave. crossing 1630 detrain passengers, water coaches, fuel locomotives (560 miles)
DP Willard 1730
AR New Castle 2335 change crew
DP New Castle 2340

Friday - May 18th
BY - Pittsburgh 0240
AR - Cumberland 0520 change crew
DP - Cumberland 0525
AR - Brunswick 0725 change crew
DP - Brunswick 0730
AR - Richmond 1130 change crew
DP - Richmond 1135
AR - Rocky Mount 1335 change crew
DP - Rocky Mount 1340
AR - Florence 1640 change crew, fuel locomotives (809 miles)
DP - Florence 1650
AR - Savannah 2005 change crew
DP - Savannah 2015
AR - Jacksonville 2245

Special Instructions:

On arrival Cincinnati, Ohio, Sunday May 13th, arrange to switch coach CSXT
350 / Illinois into consist between CSXT 308/Florida and CSXT 10/New York see *
above. This car was used on train P920-10.


[ Reply To This Message ][ Quote ]



Date: 05/12/01 06:49
RE: CSX OCS Schedule
Author: EDurnwald

Thanks Very Much, for the info.

I was wondering how I can get a photo of CSX 9992-9993.

Thanks, Again!

Eddie Durnwald
Fostoria, Ohio


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Date: 05/12/01 08:14
RE: CSX OCS Schedule-- Route to Columbus
Author: P

On Sunday, May 13, departing Cincinnati to Columbus. Will this train go to Columbus via the Midland Sub or via some other route? I would like to catch it on the Midland Sub if possible, although it appears it will be dark.

P


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Date: 05/12/01 08:43
RE: CSX OCS Schedule-- Route to Columbus
Author: k8dti

Should be the Midland. You can pretty well bet this thing will run early on the ferry move, barring unforseen delays. It usually takes about 5 hours between Etowah & Corbin, but they have 6 in the schedule. You might want to trace the train and check its progress from time to time.


[ Reply To This Message ][ Quote ]



Date: 05/12/01 18:18
RE: CSX OCS Schedule-- Route to Columbus
Author: shagman269755

Wow it looks like I might be able to catch this one in Newton Falls. Hope its not late. Any big shots due to be on it? Thanks for the heads up. Joe


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ns-ocs-01-x

 

ns-ocs-02-x

I didn’t take long for word to get out at the Great Berea Train show on Saturday that the Norfolk Southern executive train was coming. Reportedly, it was headed for St. Louis.

It departed its base in Altoona, Pennsylvania, in late morning, which meant it was likely to pass through Cleveland in late afternoon.

My fellow Akron Railroad Club member Todd Dillon decided to intercept it at Hudson, which it passed through just before 5 p.m.

I left the train show just after 4:30 p.m. and headed for Olmsted Falls. Eastbound manifest freight 34N or 34M (I don’t remember which letter it was) was passing through as I arrived. It would be the only eastbound I would see over the next two hours.

Operating under symbol 955, the OCS was following manifest freight 11V. L13, the Bellevue-Rockport Yard turn, and a coal train, the 552, would also depart westbound ahead of it.

About 5:30 p.m., ARRC Bulletin Editor Marty Surdyk arrived. He had planned to run home to grab his camera, but traffic leaving the train show was heavy.

He reckoned that it would be cloudy when the OCS came through and his chances of getting a good image on slide film were slim. So he just came out to watch and didn’t bother to get his camera.

Marty’s hunch proved to be correct. There was some nice sunlight just before the L13 led the late afternoon westbound parade, but by the time 955 showed up at 6:53 p.m., it was cloudy and dark.

Even with a digital camera, it was a tough image to make. But I got it and saw something I don’t see often.

It also means that the last two times that I’ve seen the NS OCS I’ve been trackside with Marty.  We had caught the OCS last month at Salem on the Fort Wayne Line.

The consist of the train was NS F9A 4270, F9B 4275, F9B 4276, F9A 4271, and passengers cars 23, Buena Vista; 24, Delaware; 19, Kentucky; 18, New Orleans; 2, Carolina; 4, Michigan; 14, Missouri; 13, Georgia; 11, Illinois; 9, Alabama; 20, Ohio; 3, Claytor Lake; 7, Pennsylvania; and 39 (a power car).

Even in the near dark it was an impressive looking consist. It was not a bad way to begin October.

Tags:executive trains, Norfolk Southern OCS, NS 4270, NS executve train, NS in Olmsted Falls, NS OCS, NS OCS train, OCS trains, Olmsted Falls Ohio, passenger trains
Posted in Railfanning News and Features | Leave a Comment »

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The CSX OCS Train in Classic B\u0026O Paint on the Sand Patch at Mance

CSX plans to send an executive train to Louisville, Kentucky, for the 142nd running of the Kentucky Derby on May 7.

The train will bring VIP guests and policymakers aboard a train pulled by F40PH locomotives.

Jay Westbrook, CSX assistant vice president of passenger operations, said that in some years the trains has had as many as 15 cars.

CSX logo 3Westbrook said CSX views the train as another way to serve customers and collaborate with Kentucky officials on new ways to spur economic development.

One passenger who won’t be aboard will be Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin. He was invited, but said he was unable to make the trip.

The train will deadhead from Jacksonville, Florida, to the Kentucky capital city of Frankfort in the days before the Derby.

It will depart Frankfort on the morning of the Derby, which is run in late afternoon.

CSX has arrangements to lease additional passenger cars if needed and to use R.J. Corman Railroad Group tracks between Frankfort and Anchorage.

Special trains to the Derby are as old as the race itself and at one time 12 to 15 special trains descended upon Louisville on Derby Day.

Some specials came from as far away as Texas, Philadelphia, Detroit, Cleveland, Atlanta, New Orleans and Chicago.

Upwards of 200 Pullmans would be parked near Louisville Union Station, with many of them providing hotel accommodations for the railroad guests.

Corman and Norfolk Southern have also operated specials to the Derby, but it is not yet known if the NS executive train will be a visitor.

The NS office car train did not operate this year to The Masters Tournament in Augusta, Georgia.

Tags:CSX, CSX executive train, CSX OCS, Kentucky Derby, Kentucky Derby trains, Norfolk Southern, R.J. Corman Railroad Group
Posted in Railroad News | Leave a Comment »

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Ocs train csx

RailRoadFan.com

CSX OCS 5/29/14

Unread postby Ypsi »

Yesterday I read in the CSX locations and updates that there would be a CSX OCS coming through Michigan today. I received a couple of updates about the crew call time and departure from Toledo time, so ConrailMan5 and I decided to head out and catch it before work and school. Our day started at 5:30am because I accidently misinterpreted the crew call time of about 5:30am for the departure time. By the time I heard that the train would be departing Toledo at about 7:00am we were already up and ready to go so we figured we would head out and see what we could see before the OCS in Romulus. We arrived at Romulus just after 6:00am, and shortly after a WB NS train called for Preston and then Romulus. At 6:20am, the sun is still rising in the east at a pair of Dash 9's hustles the train west.



After the WB NS train there was a lull in traffic.. a lull that lasted until the CSX OCS showed up. We waited a couple hours for other traffic, and of course the OCS. While we were making a check of the NB CSX signals and looking down the tracks we saw a headlight racing north, passing another train switching at New Boston. Without wasting any time we set up a shot in good light at Shook Road. At 8:48am the CSX OCS clears Romulus north with the CSXT 9998 leading, CSXT 9999 trailing, and 11 Business Cars.



ImageCSX Officer Car Special, Romulus Michiganby Michigan Central Lines, on Flickr

The consist of the train was as follows: (I think I got all of the business car names right)

CSXT 9998
CSXT 9999
Kentucky
Youngstown
Mississippi
West Virginia
Indiana
Waycross
North Carolina
Baltimore
New York
Ohio
Georgia

Thanks for looking and reading! 8)

Last edited by Ypsi on Fri May 30, 2014 9:13 am, edited 1 time in total.

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CSX OCS SPECIAL AT SUNNYSIDE IN GRAND RAPIDS

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Now discussing:

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